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Atlanta Based Fatherhood Organization Plans the Largest Collaboration of Fatherhood Focused Back-to-School Effort in the Nation in 80 Cities.

Atlanta, GA–Research shows when fathers are involved in the lives of their children, especially their education, children learn more, perform better in school, and exhibit healthier behavior. Even when fathers do not share a home with their children, their active involvement can have a lasting and positive impact. Additionally, children have fewer behavior problems when fathers listen to and talk with them regularly and are active in their lives. “This reality emphasizes the importance of engaging fathers in the educational life of their children,” says Kenneth Braswell; Executive Director of Fathers Incorporated and founder of the literacy program; Real Dads Read.

30937728138_049a39fecc_oOn Friday, September 28th; Fathers Incorporated will present the Million Fathers March in schools across the U.S.. The schools are encouraged to engage in activities that support the theme, “Real Dads Read (RDR).”  Currently RDR has over 70+ libraries in Barbershops and Schools across Atlanta and Columbus, GA.

“Reading is a fundamental skill. A child’s ability to read proficiently by third grade is the most significant predictor of his or her school success, high school completion, and future economic stability. However, approximately 80% of low-income children will not achieve this crucial milestone,” says Braswell. RDR attempts to change this outcome by engaging barbershops, schools and other educational entities in Atlanta to encourage fathers to read to their children. Reading to children is also a clear and beneficial way for fathers to spend quality time with their children.

30937631098_8111e5ff23_oThe Million Fathers March (MFM) is an opportunity for men to build on their relationships and show their commitment to the educational lives of their children throughout the school year. Since the March began in 2004, fathers and other significant male caregivers across the United States and around the world have gathered to accompany their children to their first or designated day of the new school year. Each annual MFM marks the beginning of a year-long commitment by men to their children’s educational success.

By design, the MFM is a community-driven event and is not restricted to fathers only. Grandfathers, foster fathers, stepfathers, uncles, cousins, big brothers, significant male caregivers, family friends, and other male role models are all encouraged to participate. Additionally, representatives from such entities as public and private schools, community-based organizations, government agencies, local businesses and faith institutions along with elected officials are also asked to join in and support The March.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO REGISTER YOUR SCHOOL, visit www.millionfathersmarch.com, call 770.804.9800 or email fathersincorporated@gmail.com.

Project is founded and inspired by the Black Star Project and supported by Hachette Books, Literacy for All Fund, Walton Family Foundation, Anne E. Casey Foundation, Furthering Fathering and Little Free Libraries

#realdadsread #mfm2018

Posted by Fathers Incorporated

Fathers Incorporated (FI) is a national, non-profit organization working to build stronger families and communities through the promotion of Responsible Fatherhood. Established in 2004, FI has a unique seat at the national table, working with leaders in the White House, Congress, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Family Law, and the Responsible Fatherhood Movement. FI works collaboratively with organizations around the country to identify and advocate for social and legislative changes that lead to healthy father involvement with children, regardless of the father’s marital or economic status, or geographic location. From employment and incarceration issues, to child support and domestic violence, FI addresses long-standing problems to achieve long-term results for children, their families, the communities, and nation in which they live.

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