by Jane Sandwood for DadsPadBlog.com

Nearly thirty years ago, the common image of a family was based on the disciplinarian father who worked a 9 to 5 job while the mother stayed at home. Men were only expected to provide for their families and let their partner handle the upbringing of their children. However, with today’s modern man, fatherhood is making a change.

As more women are entering the workforce and taking the world by storm, men are now expected to be equal partners at work, raising children, and performing household duties. Some men are even choosing to become stay-at-home dads to spend quality time with their families. In fact, over 2 million men have become stay-at-home dads in the United States since 2012. So, what does fatherhood look like in the 21st-century?

Here’s what it takes to be a 21st-century man and father.

Gaining Confidence With Who They Are

The modern man is now more comfortable in himself than the previous generations have been. Decades ago, society once dictated how men should stay in control of their emotions and never reveal their weaknesses. Today, men understand who they are, what they’re doing and where they are going. He understands the proper work ethics, masters his responsibilities and how to fulfill his role as a father and spouse.

Modern Dads Are Becoming More Involved

Today’s dads are becoming more involved in their family’s lives. In fact, the new species of fatherhood is often found in more homes and playdates, where moms once dominated. Despite the fact that the connection between mother and baby started before the water breaks, the bond fathers make starts on Day 1.

Embracing Your Children

While many millennial dads had a less-than-desirable childhood, modern men are looking to do their childhood over and enjoy the time spent with their children. Fathers are embracing their childish side, by staying involved and reading books, teaching new sports, playing video games and more.

Finding Success Outside Their Molded Careers

As a boy, you might have dreamed about what you would become when you grew up. Those dreams may have changed along the way, while some knew their path and stuck to it. According to an article from Huffington Post, less than 30% of employees landed their dream job or work in a related field. The most successful men are those who find success in doing what they want to do. While we all have different levels of skills and interest, sometimes it takes a few failures to reach that success.

What it means to be a man and father in the 21st-century is to adapt and evolve with the changes today. While there will always be good and father fathers out in the world, there is no right or wrong ones – in fact, we’re all just making it up as we go along with parenting. Fatherhood is a demanding job that requires more than one task to finish at a time, with the never-ending competition for your attention. That’s just the beauty of the millennial father.

Posted by Fathers Incorporated

Fathers Incorporated (FI) is a national, non-profit organization working to build stronger families and communities through the promotion of Responsible Fatherhood. Established in 2004, FI has a unique seat at the national table, working with leaders in the White House, Congress, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Family Law, and the Responsible Fatherhood Movement. FI works collaboratively with organizations around the country to identify and advocate for social and legislative changes that lead to healthy father involvement with children, regardless of the father’s marital or economic status, or geographic location. From employment and incarceration issues, to child support and domestic violence, FI addresses long-standing problems to achieve long-term results for children, their families, the communities, and nation in which they live.

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